Matt MacVey Data Sets

  1. Vacant publicly owned land. https://data.cityofnewyork.us/Housing-Development/Vacant-Publicly-Owned-Land/c8vj-e9jc
    Vacant private land and tax assessment https://docs.google.com/a/journalism.cuny.edu/spreadsheet/pub?key=0AvZsPWOMRFsAdDhhMFNmSW81WVhkRWhmQnc5emFFM3c&output=html
    Bill de Blasio has stated that he wants to increase taxes on vacant lots  to encourage building on these sites. Where are these spaces and what effect are they having on their communities. These vacant spaces are often turned into community gardens. Vacant lots  provide a significant portion of the wild habitat that supports biodiversity in New York City. I could talk with people that use community gardens made from similar lots. What species that might lose habitat?
  2. Census Computer and Internet Access in the United States 2012 http://www.census.gov/hhes/computer/publications/2012.html
    Smartphone and internet access data. There is potential for stories about differing access between income levels or states. I think that it could be interesting to find some regions that are being held back by a lack of internet access. I could look at the difference between rural and urban New York state or look at the differences within New York City.
    This new census data is the first to show information about access to smartphones. Some people are looking to smartphones to help with inequality in access to the internet, the digital divide. I want to look at what this new data shows about smartphones and the digital divide and whether having smartphone access has the same economic impact as other types of broadband access.
    Another angle, 25% of households don’t have internet access. What do those households look like?
  3. Starbucks locations. http://www.starbucks.com/store-locator/search/location/10033
    I read a piece about a new Starbucks uptown and the economic changes this signifies for commercial renting in the area. (http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20140119/RETAIL_APPAREL/301199992/chain-reaction-in-inwood).
    De Blasio’s mayorship has put a spotlight on inequality, gentrification, and the economic identity of the outer boroughs. So, what does it mean when a Starbucks arrives in a new part of town? Readers will find out what neighborhoods Starbucks are clustered in, median household income, median commercial rent, how those numbers have changed in the last five or 10 years, and if those neighborhoods seen big demographic shifts.
    I can pull out a few stories to focus on, maybe someplace where a Starbucks closed or a place where Starbucks challenged a local coffee shop.